When to reflect

A story of quitting on the way to the top

Ipswich, Queensland – 1996. Ashleigh Barty is born to an indigenous dad and a mother with English descendancy. Humble beginnings served Ash well, and her attitude was old school right from the start. She opted for tennis instead of netball as a child because, in her words “netball is a girls sport”. Ash rapidly became a gun tennis player winning the Wimbledon Juniors title at age 15.

Next step – the Pro’s. Ash would spend the next two years earning every start to every tournament she played in. Eventually Ash would experience some success in the doubles game more than singles. Ranked outside the top 200 in the world, Ash then made a decision… she quit.

“it was too much too quickly for me as I’ve been travelling from quite a young age… I wanted to experience life as a normal teenaged girl and have some normal experiences.”

Ash had a chat to some cricket administrators about trialling for a new WBBL (Womens Big Bash League) concept. Unlike others that tried to cross over from different sports, Ash had the goods and was signed up for the Brisbane Heat’s inaugural season.

Playing Twenty20 cricket fro Brisbane - taking a break

After two years hiatus, Ash decided to return to tennis in 2016. Starting from the bottom again, she would compete well straight away. Ash was now ready to take on the challenge of the Pro Tour. In 2017, The Malaysian Open becomes her first Top Tier (WTA) Singles Title, followed by a string of successes in the doubles game.

In a world of big personalities and brands like Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova, Ash is unnoticeable. Almost invisible on the world stage. In Australia, the antics of Nick Kyrios get 100 times more column space in the papers than Ash. But like a skilled ninja she operates in the shadows slowly but surely working her way up the world rankings.

As Ernest Hemmingway once said, “everything in life happens gradually, and then suddenly”.

Boom – Ash Barty is the 2019 French Open Singles Champion. Ash Barty is the world ranked number two player in the world. Aged 23 years old. But she is not just a Major Winner. She is a force to be reckoned with. Her game is tight. She is strong, skillful, and strategic.

What a story.

The girl has come a long way

But, for me, this is a story of quitting. Ash taught us that we are all allowed to quit, but we can never give up on our ultimate goal. Ash never stopped being a professional tennis player, she just took some time out from playing tennis.

Angela Duckworth writes about the power of ‘never giving up’ in her book Grit.

ne of the building blocks of grit, or Tenacity as I put it, is the practice of committing to something hard. Duckworth’s rules are:

  1. You need to have one hard thing to practice regularly.
  2. You can quit, but only at a natural stopping point that is designated at the start.
  3. You choose your own.

Thank you Ashleigh Barty for teaching us about the power of quitting while never giving up.   

This article first appeared on https://www.paulfarina.com.au

The Pitch In: Grow Community Golf campaign

Golf is gearing up to ensure that our elected representatives are doing their bit to support the game and its facilities at the local level.

Much of the urgent work needs to be carried out in regional areas, but some of Australia’s biggest cities also have courses that need help too.

Golf facilities are more than just places for playing golf. They are community hubs that include a place for weddings, birthdays, funeral wakes, family reunions, small business conferences and charitable events.  The buildings at our community golf courses are invariably not private, but a place for everybody to use and enjoy appropriately. 

Therefore, the people who benefit from investing in the facilities extend well and truly beyond those just using the golf course.

Community golf projects like the ones found at Merbein in the Mallee, Palmerston City in the NT, Robe in SA and Riverside in Tassie – these are great places for Australians to use in so many ways. But they need help.  They need our elected representatives to Pitch In.

Learn more at http://www.pitchinforgolf.com.au

February 2019 Update

It’s been a pleasure to get to know our valued members over my first 6 months as Executive Director, and it’s my aim to reflect your concerns, needs and interests in the initiatives we undertake on your behalf. The beginning of 2019 has already presented exciting opportunities and sweeping changes to both ASGA and the broader industry, and I eagerly look forward to working closely with members and industry partners moving forward.

ASGA REBRANDING Following over 6 months of work, we’re proud to launch the completely revamped branding of ASGA. From the updated logo design, to the full redevelopment of the ASGA website, we’re excited to bring in the new year with a fresh perspective for our members. We invite you to explore the ASGA branding changes at ​www.asga.com.au.

SUSTAINABILITY PROJECTS Another new focus for 2019, we’re keenly working on numerous projects to address the immediate and important waste-management challenges within the sector. With the aim of developing an effective industry-led approach, we’ll be holding a series of forums on sustainability issues over the coming months.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT As part our renewed commitment in developing industry professionals, ASGA has partnered with team performance specialist, ​ Paul Farina, to deliver a series of educational Masterclasses. These bespoke short-courses cover a range of topics including Leadership, Strategy and Team Performance; learn more at ​asga.com.au/masterclasses​.

HAVE YOUR SAY It’s our mission to advocate for the interests of our membership base, and we invite you to share your thoughts regarding positive changes to be made to the Sporting Goods Industry.  Please feel free to reach out via ​phone​ or ​email​, and I will also endeavour to conduct face-to-face conversations with many of our members in the coming year.

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